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Meri Pyaari Bindu movie review: Frothy and engaging

Meri Pyaari Bindu movie review: Frothy and engaging

"Meri Pyaari Bindu" from the Yash Raj Films (YRF) stable is a sincere yet frothy tale, designed from a pulp novel. And like any other pulp fiction, this film is a light-hearted fluff, racy and engaging.

Designed as a catharsis, it is the tale of a successful pulp writer Abhimanyu Roy aka Bubla, who has compiled novellas like "Chudail Ki Choli", "Dracula's Lover" and "Das Cabin", among many more.

On the insistence of his publisher, Abhimanyu is forced to write a romance, which he does begin but is stuck between his real-life heartache and imagination. He finds it difficult to chronicle his thoughts about this "unpredictable, impatient, imperfect, crazy, restless and larger than life, live-wire girl" called Bindu, who was once his neighbour and who over a period of time crept into his life and soul.

So, when Abhi returns home and stumbles upon an old audio cassette with their favourite playlist, it sends Abhi down memory lane and his novel unravels speedily juxtaposing his past and present.

With a good dosage of old Hindi film songs and titbits as transitions, metaphors and analogies, the treatment of the chaotically jumbled script along with the screenplay, is astutely handled. The plot moves at a frenzied pace regaling the ecstasy and agony of Abhimanyu and Bindu.

While the plot is well-charted, it is the conflict and the resolution that disappoint. It lacks substance in terms of oomph and other exploiting factors that make for engrossing viewing. The non-linear narrative style, at times, creates confusion with the timelines.

The dialogues too are worth a mention and are delivered with gusto.

Ayushmann Khurana, with an intellectual demeanour, plays the flurried pulp writer Abhimanyu Roy with panache. With natural ease, he internalises his character and communicates his affection through his intense gaze. He is sincere and endearing in his portrayal and it shows.

On the other hand, Parineeti Chopra essays Bindu with dexterity yet she seems superficial and shallow, especially in the restaurant scene when she tells Abhimanyu about her boyfriend, Mathew. Her portrayal of the character lacks depth.

The rest of the supporting cast is natural and have their moments of on-screen glory. Especially noteworthy is the character who plays Abhimanyu's mother.

Technically, the film is well-mounted. The camera movements are fluid and the flow of the visuals seem uninterrupted with the skilful and smooth editing. The songs naturally integrate into the narrative.

Overall, while the film is interestingly told and is engaging, the last scene, though it talks about a happy ending, unsettles the purist.

From Zee News

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