close
This ad will auto close in 10 seconds

Govt keen to set up stressed assets fund to fight NPAs: Sinha

Amid reports that an arm of nation's largest lender SBI may set up a dedicated distressed assets fund, Union Minister Jayant Sinha on Tuesday said the government is indeed working on such a proposal, but declined to share details.  


Govt keen to set up stressed assets fund to fight NPAs: Sinha

Mumbai: Amid reports that an arm of nation's largest lender SBI may set up a dedicated distressed assets fund, Union Minister Jayant Sinha on Tuesday said the government is indeed working on such a proposal, but declined to share details.

"The details are being worked out," he said, when asked if SBI will lead the proposed bad bank or the national ARC to tackle mounting bad loans, which has crossed Rs 8 trillion.

"We are working towards stressed assets funds. As I have said multiple times in the past, we need an efficient resolution and then recovery processes for our banks," the Union Minister of State for Finance told reporters on the sidelines of a Crisil seminar on corporate bond markets here.

When asked about the size of the proposed fund, Sinha limited himself to saying that it will be "significant".

According to a report, an arm of SBI may team up with global private equity major Warburg Pincus and two sovereign wealth funds from West Asia to launch a USD 3-billion distressed assets fund.

The maiden sovereign investment fund, National Investment and Infrastructure Fund, with a corpus of Rs 40,000 crore, may also invest in the proposed national bad bank.

The government had first floated the idea of a 'bad bank' last year, but Reserve Bank Governor Raghuram Rajan had questioned its efficacy in a system where public-sector lenders held the bulk of bad loans.

According to Rajan, a 'bad bank' works well in a scenario where private sector lenders have accumulated large chunks of stressed assets. "There really is no need for a bad bank because the capitalisation is going to be in the hands of the government," he had said on February 2 after announcing the monetary policy.

Rajan had added that such a body with state-run characteristics can face trouble if it pays too high for an asset, while if it pays too low, the state-run banks will face flak for selling cheap.

"It is not clear to me that a quasi-public entity will solve that problem effectively," he had said.

Sinha today said a committee is looking into the issue of the quantum of haircuts which banks can take at the time of taking over a bad asset to make it a sustainable.

"Those sustainable levels of debt are going to be a commercial decision for the banks, but we want to make sure the process is a high integrity process," Sinha said.

From Zee News

0 Comment - Join the Discussions