IPL 2018: KL Rahul replaces Ambati Rayudu to take Orange Cap while Andrew Tye takes Purple

While KL Rahul held fort and carried his bat through to continue his purple patch (95 not out off 70 balls), losing partners from other hands not only put pressure on Punjab but also robbed Rahul of taking his chances against the RR bowlers. 

IPL 2018: KL Rahul replaces Ambati Rayudu to take Orange Cap while Andrew Tye takes Purple
Courtesy: PTI

New Delhi: In-form KXIP batsman KL Rahul replaced CSK's Ambati Rayudu at the top of batting charts after his 95 not out against RR took him to 471 runs in 10 innings and take the Orange Cap. However, his inning couldn't help Punjab claim a victory. Rayudu is pushed to the second spot with 423 runs. 

On the other hand, KXIP pacer Andrew Tye got his hands on the Purple Cap with a four-wicket haul against RR. He replaced RCB seamer Umesh Yadav, who was placed with 14 wickets. 

While KL Rahul held fort and carried his bat through to continue his purple patch (95 not out off 70 balls), losing partners from other hands not only put pressure on Punjab but also robbed Rahul of taking his chances against the RR bowlers. With the eventual difference being 15 runs, Rahul would have only asked for a partner who could just take the game deeper. But that wasn't to be as Punjab kept losing wickets at regular intervals. 

For Punjab, Andrew Tye's effort of four wickets, which also earned him the purple cap, couldn't ensure the side a win. Not just Tye, the breakthrough, and the brakes were put on with the help of some intelligent bowling by Afghanistan's mystery spinner Mujeeb Ur Rahman. He picked up two wickets -- that of Sanju Samson and dangerman Jos Buttler -- to help KXIP claw back.

On both occasions, it was his googly that did the trick. Both Samson and Buttler jumped out fractionally early to signal Mujeeb to alter his length. His late release aided in delivering the googly and the batsmen were deceived.

Before the 20th over, Tye had forgettable figures of 3-0-28-1, though he did pick Ajinkya Rahane early with a knuckleball. Tye experienced expensive two overs later on but it was the 20th over in which Tye totally cut down on his pace and tried to be at least predictable. With batsmen charging at him, he rolled fingers and used the knuckleball to good effect. 

His three dismissals in the last over were perfect examples of how his reading of the pitch helped him better his figures. The Sawai Man Singh pitch had slowed down considerably and was gripping the surface. 

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