Robin Gibb was probed by FBI for making death threats to 1st wife’s lawyer

Last Updated: Tuesday, September 4, 2012 - 13:03

London: Robin Gibb was investigated by the FBI after he allegedly made death threats to his first wife’s divorce lawyer.

The late Bee Gees singer separated from Molly Hullis in 1980 after 12 years of marriage and newly-released documents show just how ugly the split turned.

Staff at Haymon and Walters, the law firm representing Hullis, reported Gibb to authorities after receiving “numerous threatening telegrams from Gibb which threatened their lives,” the records show.

He told them he had hired a hitman to kill them, sparking a probe by investigators that could have led to jail, the Daily Mail reported.

In one telegram, Gibb wrote: “What you have done is just about the limit. I warned and warned you. The situation is now very serious. Know one (sic) walks all over me... I have had enough.``

“I have taken out a contract on (name deleted by FBI). It is now a question of time,” he wrote.

The New York Post acquired the legal papers from the FBI after a Freedom of Information request following Gibbs’ death.

They show that investigators considered taking further action and asking Western Union, who sent the telegrams, for further information.

Agents also discussed how to look into the allegations without tipping off Gibb, who was at the height of his fame with brothers Maurice and Robin after the success of the album ‘Saturday Night Fever.’

The matter was eventually dropped after Gibb’s lawyers wrote to the FBI and said the singer “would not be foolish enough to carry out any threat, especially in view of his singing career.”

According to the publication, Gibb’s accused his wife of tipping off the FBI in an attempt to embarrass the star as a negotiating tactic in their divorce.

Documents reveal that the FBI closed the file on Gibbs in March 1981 because Hullis and her lawyers declined to press charges.

ANI



First Published: Tuesday, September 4, 2012 - 13:03

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