Steven Tyler writes op-ed on copyright after Trump drama

Aerosmith frontman Steven Tyler wants to make sure that music and art don't mix with politics, following his open request to Donald Trump to stop using "Dream On" in his campaigns.

PTI| Updated: Oct 16, 2015, 12:35 PM IST
Steven Tyler writes op-ed on copyright after Trump drama

New York: Aerosmith frontman Steven Tyler wants to make sure that music and art don't mix with politics, following his open request to Donald Trump to stop using "Dream On" in his campaigns.

Tyler has written an essay about copyright law as an op-ed for Huffington Post in which the 67-year-old singer said a change is needed to make sure creators are paid fairly when other business use our work.

"This week, I sent a letter to Donald Trump's campaign asking to not use my music at political rallies. My intent was not to make a political statement, but to make one about the rights of my fellow music creators," Tyler wrote.

"To try and change laws that are hindering the music biz. To make sure that songwriters and artists can practice their art without threat of extinction. To make sure those who practice their craft get paid fairly when others use their work."

His piece continued pointing out flaws within the music industry which affect mostly less wealthy songwriters and artists. "Everyone deserves to be able to pay their bills, support their families, and do the work they love," he wrote.

"Too many can't because we are being shortchanged by new and old technology companies."

He also noted that "seventy-five percent of songwriters' income in the US is regulated by the government. Too much government intervention in art and music is a bad thing ...We need change."

The founding member of the Grammy organisation's Creators' Alliance, concluded, "We know you love our music. Now is the time to show us some love by supporting the effort to reform outdated copyright laws, do away with government standard for artist compensation, and make sure creators are paid fairly when other business use our work."

Tyler's lawyers fired off a cease-and-desist letter to Trump after the presidential hopeful failed to ask for permission to use the track in his rallies. Trump complied to the request but fired back, "Even though I have the legal right to use Steven Tyler's song, he asked me not to. Have better one to take its place!"