US teens are less sexually active now: report

Less than half of US teenagers today are sexually active, far fewer than in the late 1980s, a US government report said today.

US teens are less sexually active now: report
Pic courtesy: Thinkstock Photos Image for representation purpose only.

Washington: Less than half of US teenagers today are sexually active, far fewer than in the late 1980s, a US government report said today.

The findings are based on survey data spanning 1988 to 2013, called the National Survey of Family Growth, offering a glimpse at national estimates of sexual activity, contraceptive use and childbearing among teenagers aged 15-19.

"In 2011-2013, 44 per cent of female teenagers and 47 per cent of male teenagers aged 15-19 had experienced sexual intercourse," said the report by the National Center for Health Statistics.

"The percentage has declined significantly, by 14 per cent for female and 22 per cent for male teenagers, over the past 25 years."

In 1988, 60 per cent of teenage boys and 51 per cent of teenage girls were sexually active.

The lowest points were seen in the 2006-2010 range for females, with 43 per cent saying they had had sex at least once.

For males, the lowest number was 46 per cent in 2002.

When researchers separated the data by age, they found that 15-year-olds were the least likely to have had sex (about 15 per cent).

The likelihood of sexual activity increased over time. Almost two in three 19-year-olds have experienced intercourse at least once, the report said.

The declining rates of sexually active youth coincide with previous research that has found a big drop in the teen birth rate.

In 2013, the teen birth rate of 27 per 1,000 people was less than a third of the historically highest rate in 1957, when it was 96 per 1,000.

Contraception use has stayed about the same in recent years, with condoms still being the most popular choice followed by withdrawal and oral contraceptives, the report found.

"In 2011-2013, 79 per cent of female teenagers and 84 per cent of male teenagers used a method of contraception the first time they had sexual intercourse," it said.

"The percentages have not changed over time."

Emergency contraceptive use has climbed from eight per cent of girls in 2002 to 22 per cent in 2011-2013.

By age 17, girls who did not use a contraceptive method the first time they had sex were five times as likely to become pregnant as girls who did use some kind of method.

This report is based on data from 1,037 females and 1,088 males in the United States.

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. You can find out more by clicking this link

Close