MIFF to pay tribute to Satyajit Ray

Last Updated: Wednesday, January 18, 2012 - 15:51

Kolkata: This year`s edition of the Mumbai International Film Festival (MIFF) will pay a tribute to Satyajit Ray by screening documentaries and short films made on or by the legendary filmmaker.

Acclaimed filmmaker Shyam Benegal`s memorable
documentary `Satyajit Ray` (1985) on the Oscar-winning director will be screened as part of the tribute in the India`s largest documentary, short and animation film festival from February 3 to 9.

An ardent Ray fan, Benegal had interviewed him about his relationship with his mother, how he became a film-maker, and why he doesn`t believe in gimmicks to sell his films in the 136-minute-long docu.

Utpalendu Chakraborty`s rare 77-minute documentary titled `Child Artistes and Satyajit Ray`, which is regarded as the only film in India that presents the Ray`s love for children, will be the special attraction.

The film explores the mastery of Satyajit Ray over children not only in terms of presenting them as characters within a film, but also through stories written specifically with the child-reader and child-viewer in mind.

In 1972, Ray had directed `Inner Eye`, an award-winning 20 minute documentary that tell a poignant tale of accomplished painter Binode Bihari Mukherjee who lost his sight following an unsuccessful cataract operation at the age of 54.

He continued to create art despite loss of sight as his inner eye guided his fingers to work.

Another Ray`s 1976 documentary `Bala` about the Bharatanatyam dancer Balasaraswati will also be shown at the film carnival.

`Pikoo` (Pikoo`s Day) is another short film directed by Ray in 1980 which stars Aparna Sen and Victor Banerjee.

Altogether 101 films will be shown at MIFF with 40 international works and 61 films from India.

PTI



First Published: Wednesday, January 18, 2012 - 15:51

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