Victorian maidens on Delhi`s streets to dazzle in `Aisha`
Last Updated: Monday, August 02, 2010, 11:40
  

New Delhi: Big cars, plush bungalows, polo matches, wine ceremonies, designer wear and the brouhaha of the upper class - Jane Austen`s Victorian novel `Emma` takes a contemporary turn in the Indian capital in romantic comedy `Aisha`, releasing Friday.

Produced by debutante Rhea Kapoor, 23, under the banner of her father`s Anil Kapoor Film Company, it has been directed by Rajshree Ojha. The movie is a modern-day adaption of the 19th century British novel and stars Sonam Kapoor, 25, in the lead as a Delhi-based, free-spirited, stylish and spoilt high society girl, who feels she is naturally gifted in finding love matches.

"The thing that worked in favour of `Emma` was the theme of the novel - matchmaking. It is very prevalent in our society and people here are obsessed with marriages," said Ojha.

"Then in `Emma`, the setting is vast rich fields, big houses and everything lavish. For me, all that was in Delhi. I needed that rich culture and tradition and big houses with sprawling gardens, which one can find only in Delhi.

"Also, the class thing is very prevalent in Delhi and it is not based on the caste system, but more on the monetary position," she added.

Distributed by PVR Pictures, "Aisha" also stars Abhay Deol, Arunoday Singh, Cyrus Sahukar, Ira Dubey and debutantes Lisa Haydon and Amrita Puri.

Aisha is a girl with a simple problem - that everyone`s business is her business. Arjun (Abhay) on the other hand is a boy with even a simpler set of beliefs - that Aisha should mind her own business.

Set in the Delhi upper class world with its own set of social rules, Aisha navigates her world with a great sense of style and even greater optimism. Caught in her web are Pinky (Ira), her best friend, small town girl Shefali (Amrita), rich west Delhi boy Randhir (Cyrus) and hunk Dhruv (Arunoday).

Aisha makes sure everyone dances to her tune and all Arjun wants to do is to disentangle that web and get her out of an impending sticky mess. In her world playing cupid is as easy as putting a knife in butter - if only Arjun would stay out of her way.

"Aisha is a woman with shades of grey. You will hate her at one moment but love her in the next. You can`t find out if she is evil, manipulative or a genuine and nice person," said Ojha.

The movie also had its share of controversies that the camaraderie between Rhea and Ojha was not cordial. Rhea, however, rubbished the reports saying, "There was no rift at all. I don`t know where these rumours are coming from."

Noteworthy is that funnyman Cyrus, 29, had his wits running out on the sets of "Aisha" as he was forced to learn driving for the movie apart from a free training in horse riding.

Having already created a buzz courtesy its glossy appeal, contemporary songs, sophisticated clothes, storyline and cast, this one seems like it could well be an English writer`s dream come true at the Indian box office.

IANS


First Published: Monday, August 02, 2010, 11:40



comments powered by Disqus