`Ghummakkad Narain`: Igniting kids` literary quest

Last Updated: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - 10:10

New Delhi: A three-day literary festival, `Ghummakkad Narain`, will bring together authors, children and illustrators through various workshops to strengthen reading habits amongst the kids.

This annual festival that began in 2010 has been conceptualised under the aegis of UNESCO by Nivesh and the Himalayan Hub for Art, Culture and Heritage.

It will begin in the national capital Aug 29 in association with British Council, Roli Books and Oxford Bookstore.

"The idea of this festival is to promote reading among children and support their continued interest as young adults. Reading makes you thinkers, and today more than ever we need a society that can think for itself, especially youth," said Rachna Bisht, president, Nivesh, one of the festival organisers, in a statement here Tuesday.

The workshops have been divided keeping different age groups in mind.

There is a reading session by author and naturalist Ranjit Lal for his book, "Bambi, Chop and Wag" that is meant for children in the age group of 11-12 years. Then there is an illustration activity by Emily Gravett for kids of six to 10 years.

Many such activities and workshops will keep children between six and 14 years engaged.

Roli Books being a partner, its books will be available at the two venues, British Council and Oxford Bookstore, where the activities will take place.

"We are delighted to be a part of this festival. We have some incredible writers in Young Adult list such as Paro Anand, Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni and Ranjit Lal and events such as these are a great opportunity for them to interact with their readers," said Priya Kapoor, editorial director, Roli Books.

Entry to this festival is free.

IANS



First Published: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 - 10:10
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