Green message from the Bachchans travelling around the world

Kolkata: A kilometre-long piece of cloth with `Go Green` messages, written over it by luminaries including the Bachchans and Kapil Dev, is now travelling from the North Pole to the South Pole inspiring children across the globe.

NRI fashion designer Satish Sikha has stitched hundreds of messages, each written on a yard-long eco-fabric advocating efforts to save the environment from global warming and climate change, to make a single piece of cloth.

Claimed to be the world`s longest eco hand-woven silk fabric, the cloth is being exhibited in schools across the world to spread the green word among lakhs of children.

Besides Big B, his son and actor Abhisekh Bachchan, actress Kangana Ranaut, ex Miss Universe Sushmita Sen, cricketer Kapil Dev, TDP leader Chandrababu Naidu, media entrepreneur Ramoji Rao and ad guru Alyque Padamsee have lent support to the initiative, Sikha told reporters from Toronto.

"Help this project and save our earth," superstar Amitabh Bachchan said in his message while the junior Bachchan wrote? "Be cool and fight global warming."

Kangana said, "Let`s save our planet. Who knows how much time we have? Let`s start now."

"My compilation of 1263 messages also includes inspiring words from geologists, glaciologists, scientists, doctors, corporates, professors, foresters and politicians from various countries," he said.

The designer has self-funded the project `Our earth? We will`.

"I sold away all business to fund my initiative. Even after spending 20 years in fashion, fine dining and investment services, I was not satisfied. I wanted to do something for our mother earth, whose future is under danger," he said.

An increasing dependence over fossil fuels such as oil, coal and natural gas has been blamed for the rise in global temperatures, resulting in unusual weather patterns and climate change.

According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, eleven of the twelve hottest years since thermometer readings became available occurred between 1995 and 2006.

Sikha is now busy travelling with the fabric to schools in major cities across countries beginning from the Arctic Ocean.

"The first school presentation was at the north. The designer has self-funded the project `Our earth? We will`.

"I sold away all business to fund my initiative. Even after spending 20 years in fashion, fine dining and investment services, I was not satisfied. I wanted to do something for our mother earth, whose future is under danger," he said.

An increasing dependence over fossil fuels such as oil, coal and natural gas has been blamed for the rise in global temperatures, resulting in unusual weather patterns and climate change.

According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, eleven of the twelve hottest years since thermometer readings became available occurred between 1995 and 2006.

Sikha is now busy travelling with the fabric to schools in major cities across countries beginning from the Arctic Ocean.

"The first school presentation was at the northern most part of High Arctic in Canada last month, where only 15 children studies," he said adding the journey will wind up in Antarctica next year.

During his visits, the designer-turned-activist teaches youngsters about the harmful effects of global warming while motivating them to turn eco-warriors through their small contributions by reducing carbon footprints.

"The purpose is to invite students to learn about global warming and inspire them to do their part, beginning with small acts of green initiatives," he said adding that he stresses on cultivating the habit of recycling and planting trees.

After the final presentation in Antarctica, the cloth will be cut into pieces and gifted to children in frames. PTI NIK MD SUSrn most part of High Arctic in Canada last month, where only 15 children studies," he said adding the journey will wind up in Antarctica next year.

During his visits, the designer-turned-activist teaches youngsters about the harmful effects of global warming while motivating them to turn eco-warriors through their small contributions by reducing carbon footprints.

"The purpose is to invite students to learn about global warming and inspire them to do their part, beginning with small acts of green initiatives," he said adding that he stresses on cultivating the habit of recycling and planting trees.

After the final presentation in Antarctica, the cloth will be cut into pieces and gifted to children in frames.

PTI

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