Michael Jackson`s diary reveals his movie stardom dreams

Last Updated: Saturday, September 14, 2013 - 19:12

Los Angeles: Michael Jackson wanted to achieve movie stardom in a bid to immortalise his fame, according to a secret diary that he kept before his death.

The `King of Pop`, who died at the age of 50 just weeks before a much-hyped comeback concert tour in 2009, wanted to become more famous than legendary dance and film stars Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire, reported New York Post.

"If I don`t concentrate (on) film, no immortalization. (I want to be) better than Kelly and Astaire .?.?. The greatest ever," Jackson wrote in his diary months before his death.

The pop star wanted to be "in the likes of Chaplin Michelangelo Disney. These men Demanded Perfection Innovation (sic) always."
Jackson even planned to partner with `American Idol` creator Simon Fuller to help him break into movies.

"Develop... 2 a year for 6 years .?.?. A movie a year for the next 5 years. Simon Fuller .?.? call Fuller myself (sic)."

Jackson`s family is currently in court fighting against concert promoter, AEG, claiming the entertainment giant didn`t do enough to prevent his death.

The family`s lawyers want Jackson`s writings admitted into evidence to prove that AEG was careless about his well-being. AEG, meanwhile, claims that the papers have no date and not much can be made out from his scribbles.

Jackson`s other ambitious career plans included creating a Broadway play about his life so he could become the "first multi-billionaire entertainer-actor-director." He also wanted to launch a line of soda and cookies.

The private papers also throw light on Jackson`s drug problem and include references to his personal physician Conrad Murray, who was convicted of manslaughter for giving the insomniac singer lethal doses of anesthesia that finally killed him.

"Conrad must practice now. I can`t be tired after procedure to important Rim sleep (sic)," he wrote.

PTI



First Published: Saturday, September 14, 2013 - 19:12

comments powered by Disqus