Deepika Padukone grabs the best actress trophy at IIFA 2014

By Ritika Handoo | Last Updated: Sunday, April 27, 2014 - 12:52

Zee Media Bureau/Ritika Handoo

New Delhi: The International Indian Film Academy Awards (IIFA) saw a bevy of Bollywood stars present at the big gala night. The 15th IIFA Awards was held at Florida,Tampa Bay from April 23 to 26 honouring the best performances in the field of Indian cinema. Here goes a list of who got what at the prestigious IIFA, also known as the `Bollywood Oscars`.

Best Lyrics: `Aashiqui 2`

Best Entertainer of the Year: Deepika Padukone

Best Debutant Award: Dhanush for `Raanjhanaa`

Best Picture Award: `Bhaag Milka Bhaag`

Best Performance in a leading role (male): Farhan Akhtar for `Bhaag Milka Bhaag`

Best Performance in a leading role (female): Deepika Padukone for `Chennai Express`

Best Performance in a comic Role: Arshad Warsi for `Jolly LLB`

Best Performance in negative role: Rishi Kapoor gets for `D Day`

Best Story Award: Prashoon Joshi for `Bhaag Milkha Bhaag`

Best Lyric writer: Mithoon for Tum Hi Ho from `Aashiqui 2`

Best male playback singer Award: Arijit Singh for `Tum Hi Ho` from `Aashiqui 2`

Best female playback singer Award: Shreya Goshal for ` Sun Raha Hai Na Tu` from `Aashiqui 2`

Best Direction Award: Rakeysh Om Mehra for `Bhaag Milkha Bhaag`

Life Time Achievement Award: Shatrughan Sinha

The highlight of this special award was the fact that daughter Sonakshi Sinha presented shot-gun with his lifetime achievement award for his outstanding contribution to the film industry.

The other wow moment was when Hollywood heartthrob John Travolta graced the IIFA stage. He said that he is a big fan of Hindi films and feels they are “very original and full of life”.

Kudos to the winners and buck-up time for the losers!



First Published: Friday, May 2, 2014 - 17:55

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