I was high while recording 'Blurred Lines': Robin Thicke

Singer Robin Thicke has admitted in a diposition that he lied about writing his biggest hit 'Blurred Lines' as he was high when the song was being recorded.

I was high while recording 'Blurred Lines': Robin Thicke

Los Angeles: Singer Robin Thicke has admitted in a diposition that he lied about writing his biggest hit 'Blurred Lines' as he was high when the song was being recorded.

Singer Marvin Gaye's family has sued Thicke, Pharrell Williams and TI for allegedly plagiarising Gaye's 1977 classic 'Got to Give It Up'.

When presented with quotes that the singer had given to various magazines about being inspired by Gaye, Thick said he falsely claimed credit for the song while it was Williams who wrote 'Blurred Lines', according to the transcript obtained by the Hollywood Reporter.

"I was jealous and I wanted some of the credit. I tried to take credit for it later because (Williams) wrote the whole thing pretty much by himself and I was envious of that," Thicke said under oath.

When asked if he was present while Pharrell was making the "rhythm track," Thicke said, "To be honest, that's the only part where -- I was high on Vicodin and alcohol when I showed up at the studio. So my recollection is when we made the song, I thought I wanted... To be more involved than I actually was by the time, nine months later, it became a huge hit and I wanted credit.

"So I started kind of convincing myself that I was a little more part of it than I was... I wanted some credit for this big hit. But the reality is, is that Pharrell had the beat and he wrote almost every single part of the song."

Thicke also admitted during the deposition that he was under the influence of drugs while doing press in 2013. "I didn't do a single interview last year without being high," he said.

The 37-year-old singer said he'd given up Vicodin but not alcohol. Thicke's attorney has slammed the release of transcript by Gaye's estate a desperate attempt to exploit the singer.

"Robin's moment of personal vulnerability is being exploited in the hope of diverting attention from the obvious weakness of their legal claim," Howard King said. 

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