The problem tigress of Nagpur's Bor Tiger Reserve: This is why her life is under debate

In June 2017, the Bombay High Court quashed an order by the Maharashtra Forest Department to shoot the tigress in Bramhapuri itself after her killings were reported. 

The problem tigress of Nagpur's Bor Tiger Reserve: This is why her life is under debate
(Representational image)

New Delhi: On July 29, 76 days ago, a tigress was released into the dense greens of Bor Tiger Reserve in Nagpur after she killed two people in Brahmapuri.

Forest officials, however, issued shooting orders for the problem tigress after she victimised two more people after entering Bor.

While environmentalists are raising their voice against the shooting, experts have said that tranqulizing the big cat and keeping her in confinement can solve the problem.

According to a Nagpur daily, on Monday evening, the state’s chief wildlife warden, AK Misra, issued fresh orders to shoot the problem tigress of Bor. After a journey of around 200km, the tigress is moving towards Garamsur near Bor Tiger Reserve again.

The high court in its earlier ruling had said that the order did not reflect efforts to tranquilize the tigress and NTCA SOP was not followed.

This is the third order issued since June 23 to shoot the tigress. The fresh order states, “Notwithstanding the order to shoot the tigress, all efforts shall be taken to trap and tranquilize the tigress.”

Misra issued a fresh order on Monday under Section 11(2) of the Wildlife (Protection) Act 1972 to shoot the tigress after the court had granted liberty for the same.

The order reflects report of the hurriedly constituted seven-member committee under Nagpur deputy conservator G Mallikarjuna, the daily reported.

In June 2017, the Bombay High Court quashed an order by the Maharashtra Forest Department to shoot the tigress in Bramhapuri itself after her killings were reported.

The death warrant was overturned as a result of a Public Interest Litigation petition by an animal rights activist, which argued that the tigress’s behaviour had been forged by illegal human intrusion into her territory.

As per a report in a leading daily, in its original habitat at Brahmapuri, the tigress was known for lifting cattle, an easy prey. It attacked humans when they entered territorial forests. It has a tendency to eat 7-8 kg meat from a kill and move on. It was not expected stay in Bor for long despite good prey base there.

"We hope it settles down," said a senior forester raising slim hopes of its survival, "but we fear other tigers will push it out. The 138 sqkm Bor already has five tigers. There are many villages nearby and it shouldn't pose a danger to them," he said.

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