Mongoose Bats – An evolution in the game of Cricket
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Last Updated: Monday, October 05, 2009, 15:33
  
Mongoose Bats – An evolution in the game of CricketSudeshna Guha Roy

Life is all about evolution and changes! It is true if one doesn’t change and adapt to the ever-changing situations, he/she is bound to perish.

Somewhat similar has been the case with the game of cricket as well. The sport has undergone a lot of changes over the years – while many of these were accepted out-rightly, others had to struggle their way into the pitch!

One such example is Mongoose Bats!

After the advent of T20 cricket, which is yet another massive evolution in the game of cricket and is now also a rage amongst all, Mongoose Bats have been brought into the picture to give the batsmen of this shorter format an upper hand.
After the advent of T20 cricket, which is yet another massive evolution in the game of cricket and is now also a rage amongst all, Mongoose Bats have been brought into the picture to give the batsmen of this shorter format an upper hand.

The brain child of Marcus Codrington Fernandez, former Global Creative Director for one of the biggest advertising networks in the world, the bats have been designed keeping in mind the spontaneity, power and dynamism of T20 cricket.

Though the bat has been the most sensational revolution in today’s cricketing world, the tool has not found complete acceptance despite being given a green signal by the MCC Laws sub-committee for it to be used in all levels of cricket. Only three cricketers, two women cricketers included, have used these bats in their first class matches as of now – Stuart Law (Derbyshire and Australia), Ebony Rainford-Brent (Surrey and England) and Laura Marsh (Sussex and England).This T20 specific bat has been the biggest change in terms of cricket bats since 1771.

For those who wish to know what happened in 1771 (and that number must be quite a few, I am sure), here is the ‘trivia’ for you guys.

Earlier, there were no restrictions on the kinds of bats used by the players. The bats, then, looked more like a hockey stick; very heavy at the base with a thin shaft. It was only in 1771, when Shock White, a player from a club called Ryegate, decided to use a bat the width of a stump. The idea was not digested by all, and it was only after that that a specific width of a bat was defined, which could be a maximum of 4 1/4 inches.

In 1830, a handle was added to the one piece bat as they would shatter and break anytime a powerful shot was played. Later in 1835, the length of the bat was also defined to be 38 inches.

Since then, it is the first time that some radical changes have been brought about in the area of bats.

Here are some of the facts regarding the Mongooses:

1. The Mongoose bats are an evolution to the conventional ones which are used regularly, as these have a longer handle and a shorter blade. The Mongoose’s blade is 33% shorter and its handle 43% longer than a regular bat.

2. The bats are a boost to players in T20 cricket as they allow the player to hit harder and further without changing the way of playing. According to a study by the Imperial College, the bat offers batsmen 20% more power and 15% more bat-speed than a conventional bat.

3. Due to the change in the configuration of the bat, the splice, which is generally placed inside the blade, has now been fixed into the handle to ensure there is no dead spot in the hitting area of the bat.

4. The shoulders of the bat are also rearranged by dropping them nine inches down their previous position. About 20 per cent of the weight is taken from the shoulders and redistributed to the back of the shorter blade.

5. The Mongoose made its first class debut in England’s domestic competition, the Twenty20 Cup.

First Published: Monday, October 05, 2009, 15:33


(The views expressed by the author are personal)
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