Monkey fever claims woman's life in Goa - What you need to know about this condition

Monkey fever, also known as Kyasanur Forest disease (KFD), is a tick-borne viral hemorrhagic fever endemic to South Asia.

By Zee Media Bureau | Updated: Apr 25, 2017, 13:19 PM IST
Monkey fever claims woman's life in Goa - What you need to know about this condition
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New Delhi: A 45-year-old woman from a remote area in Sattari taluka of Goa succumbed monkey fever on Monday.

According to state health officials, the woman was admitted to Goa Medical College and Hospital (GMCH) five days ago with high fever, cough, breathlessness and loose motions. She was tested positive for monkey fever which has been prevalent in state's northern belt.

Gulabi Gawas, who was being treated at Goa Medical College and Hospital (GMCH) died yesterday, a senior official attached to Directorate of Health Services told PTI on Tuesday.

The woman, who was diagnosed with monkey fever, died due to 'acute respiratory distress syndrome'.

 

Goa government has set up a centre at Valpoi in Sattari taluka for suspected KFD patients.

The official said that the centre this year tested 422 samples of which 75 turned to be positive for the disease.

What is monkey fever?

Monkey fever, also known as Kyasanur Forest disease (KFD), is a tick-borne viral hemorrhagic fever endemic to South Asia.

Causes and transmission of the disease

The disease is caused by a highly pathogenic virus called KFD virus (KFDV), belonging to the family Flaviviridae, which also includes yellow fever and dengue fever.

The disease was first reported from Kyasanur Forest of Karnataka in India in March 1957. The virus has been detected in monkeys in parts of Bandipur National Park (Chamarajnagar) and parts of the Nilgiris.

Human infection of the disease occured in Bandipur through handling of dead monkeys that were infected.

Signs and symptoms of monkey fever

  • Persons affected by the virus may show the following symptoms
  • High fever with frontal headaches
  • Followed by haemorrhagic symptoms, such as bleeding from the nasal cavity, throat, and gums, as well as gastrointestinal bleeding
  • Other symptoms include vomiting, muscle stiffness, tremors, absent reflexes, and mental disturbances

An affected person may recover in two weeks time, but the recuperating period is typically very long, lasting for several months.

Prevention

  • Wearing protective clothing
  • Tick and mosquito control
  • KFD vaccination

It is said that the vaccine has a 62.4% effectiveness rate for individuals who receive two doses. For individuals who receive an additional dose, the effectiveness of the vaccine increases to 82.9% for individuals who get an additional doses.

(With Agency inputs)