Autoimmune disease may up risk of pregnancy loss, stroke



Autoimmune disease may up risk of pregnancy loss, stroke
Washington: For years, researchers have known that antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) can trigger the production of proteins that can cause inflammation and increase the risk of formation of clots.

Now a new study provides the first estimates of the prevalence of these antibodies in patients suffering from pregnancy loss, stroke, myocardial infarction, and deep vein thrombosis.

While some aPL-positive individuals develop blood clots, strokes, and pregnancy complications, others are perfectly healthy. Individuals who are aPL-positive and have either venous thrombosis, arterial thrombosis, or fetal loss are classified as having antiphospholipid syndrome (APS).

"Based on the available data, our best estimate is that around 10 to 15 percent of clotting disorders are associated with autoimmune antiphospholipid antibodies," said Doruk Erkan, M.D., an associate attending rheumatologist and clinician researcher at Hospital for Special Surgery in New York City, who is the senior researcher of the study.

The study will be presented during the annual meeting of the American College of Rheumatology/Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals (ACR/ARHP).

ANI