‘Brit royals were 18th century medicinal cannibals’

A new book has revealed that 18th century British royalty ate human flesh and drank blood as medicinal therapy.

Last Updated: May 23, 2011, 09:02 AM IST

London: A new book on medicinal cannibalism has revealed that possibly as recently as the end of the 18th century British royalty ate human flesh and drank blood as medicinal therapy.

Richard Sugg at Durham University, the author of the book called ‘Mummies, Cannibals and Vampires’ said medicinal cannibalism was followed widely by monarchs and wealthier people in Europe.

They applied, drank, or wore powdered Egyptian mummy, human fat, flesh, bone, blood, brains and skin.

According to Sugg, moss taken from the skulls of dead soldiers was even used as a cure for nosebleeds.

“The human body has been widely used as a therapeutic agent with the most popular treatments involving flesh, bone or blood,” the Daily Mail quoted the author as saying.
“Cannibalism was found not only in the New World, as often believed, but also in Europe.

The book will be published on June 29.

ANI