Pak Army is the problem: Menon told Holbrooke

A top Indian official had told US` Af-Pak envoy in 2009 that most of the problems in Pakistan can be traced to its military`s intentions.

Last Updated: Dec 01, 2010, 13:26 PM IST

Washington: Conveying India`s view on its
neighbourhood to the US, a top Indian official had told US` Af-Pak envoy in 2009 that most of the problems in Pakistan can be traced to its military`s intentions and informed him that
post 26/11 India had consciously not attempted to take any
measures that would destabilise the civilian government there.

In his meeting with Richard Holbrooke on February 16,
2009 in New Delhi, the then Foreign Secretary Shivshankar
Menon also thanked the Special Representative for US` role in
pressing Pakistan to act on India`s dossier on Mumbai attacks
and said that it was "remarkable that we got this far".

"Turning to Pakistan, Menon observed that the mood
there had deteriorated over the past year, saying it had gone
from euphoria after the return of a civilian government to
worries over security and the economy," says a secret US
diplomatic cable released by WikiLeaks.

The US has influence, however, "where it matters
most," Menon, now the National Security Advisor, said
referring to the Pakistan Army, arguing that "most of the
problems in Pakistan can be traced to the capacity and
intentions of Pakistan`s military," it said reporting on the
meeting.

"Not only must Pakistan`s army shift its attention
from east to west, Menon asserted, but it must also cut its
links to jihadi organisations, who have gone global over the
past five years.

"Supporting Pakistan`s army is not the answer, he
said, suggesting that changing its operating assumptions would
be more effective," it said.

Menon also pointed out that in the wake of the Mumbai
terrorist attacks, India had consciously not attempted to take
any measures to destabilise Pakistan`s civilian government,
and had made every effort to continue trade and travel ties.

However, he said, Pakistan`s Army continued to make
things difficult for India, through ceasefire violations,
infiltrations and continued support for terrorist groups.

"Menon noted that India, in the wake of the Mumbai
attacks, had consciously not built up troops on the border
with Pakistan, as it had following the 2001 attack on its
Parliament," it said.
Offered an initial Indian assessment of the Pakistani
response to India`s dossier on the Mumbai terror attacks,
Menon thanked the US for its role in pressing Pakistan to act
and said that it was "remarkable that we got this far".
Still, Menon maintained, Pakistan has further to go to
bring justice to the perpetrators of the attack, and it is not
clear whether it will continue on this positive track or,
citing the Daniel Pearl case, recede when public pressure
wanes, the cable said.

Bureau Report