Tajinder Bagga demands Kamal Nath's removal over alleged role in 1984 anti-Sikh riots, goes on fast

The court convicted Sajjan Kumar for his role in the 1984 anti-Sikh riots and sentenced him to imprisonment for life.

Tajinder Bagga demands Kamal Nath's removal over alleged role in 1984 anti-Sikh riots, goes on fast

NEW DELHI: Tajinder Pal Singh Bagga, the spokesperson of the Delhi Unit of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), is sitting on an indefinite hunger strike demanding the removal of Congress leader Kamal Nath as the chief minister of Madhya Pradesh for his alleged role in 1984 anti-Sikh riots.

According to Bagga, Nath is culpable in the violence. He alleged that Nath "murdered Sikhs" and "burnt Gurdwara Rakab Ganj".

"Until Sikhs' murderer Kamal Nath is removed from this post, our fight will continue," added Bagga, who's been on the hunger strike since Monday.

“In 2004 also, Congress gave Sajjan Kumar and Tytler tickets but had to withdraw it after protests. They also had to roll back decision of appointing Nath as in-charge of its Punjab unit. By appointing him as MP chief minister, Congress has rubbed salt into wounds of Sikhs,” added Bagga.

Nath, the newly-appointed Chief Minister of MP, however, maintained that he played no role in the violence and that there are no charges against him.

The Delhi High Court on Monday convicted Sajjan Kumar for his role in the 1984 anti-Sikh riots and sentenced him to imprisonment for life. The bench of justices S Muralidhar and Vinod Goel convicted the Congress leader for offences of criminal conspiracy and abetment in commission of crimes of murder, promoting enmity between different groups on grounds of religion and doing acts prejudicial to maintenance of communal harmony and defiling and destruction of a Gurdwara.

A day later, Kumar resigned from the primary membership of the party. "I tender my resignation with immediate effect from the primary membership of the Indian National Congress in the wake of the judgement of the hon'ble high court of Delhi against me," he said in the letter to Gandhi.