'China used loudspeakers, tanks to bully India, Bhutan during Doklam standoff'

The number of Chinese troops was 10 times more than what was reported earlier, a media report quoted the book as saying.

By Zee Media Bureau | Last Updated: Sep 25, 2017, 17:09 PM IST
'China used loudspeakers, tanks to bully India, Bhutan during Doklam standoff'

New Delhi: China intimidated India and Bhutan by deploying a staggering 12,000 troops, 150 tanks and artillery during the Doklam standoff, a new book has claimed.

The book, "Securing India The Modi Way: Pathankot, Surgical Strikes and More", written by defence analyst Nitin Gokhale, contains quotes from National Security Advisor Ajit Doval, military chiefs and other senior Indian officials.

The number of Chinese troops was 10 times more than what was earlier reported, a media report quoted the book as saying. China had also used portable loudspeakers to intimidate India, the book, which also contains drone images of the area, claimed.

China deployed its troops in the Chumbi Valley close to the Indian border in Sikkim during the standoff, the book said, adding the Indian Army did not move its troops close to the border as they were not far away.

The book also claimed Chinese soldiers forcibly jostled their Bhutanese counterparts and "escorted" them to their posts after threatening them.

The Bhutanese troops later informed the Indian Army that China had warned the Royal Bhutan Army (RBA) to not interfere with the road construction they were about to undertake, after which the Indian Army decided to increase vigil.

The book gives a step-by-step account of the how the conflict escalated between China and India, which included Indian troops delivering a message through a loud-hailer from Doka La to stop construction.

The dispute erupted after India objected to the Chinese building a road through the mountainous area.

Small incursions and troop stand-offs are common along with other parts of the contested 3,500-km (2,175-mile) frontier, but the Doklam impasse was marked by its length and the failure of talks to resolve the dispute.

However on August 28, India and China agreed to withdraw troops from the disputed trijunction, ending the 73-day stand-off.

A chapter of the book would be released by Vice-President Venkaiah Naidu in Delhi on Friday.