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China's manned submersible Jiaolong finds mysterious deep-sea organisms in Indian Ocean

China's manned deep sea submersible Jiaolong collected 17 items of deep-sea living beings from the southwestern Indian Ocean on Wednesday.


China's manned submersible Jiaolong finds mysterious deep-sea organisms in Indian Ocean

Beijing: China's manned deep sea submersible Jiaolong collected 17 items of deep-sea living beings from the southwestern Indian Ocean on Wednesday.

Of the 17 samples collected, two of them were unknown for scientists.

With a size similar to a regular sea cucumber, the first mysterious creature broke into three parts when it was taken to the vessel in the south west Indian Ocean, according to official media reports.

Since the living being was transparent, scientists could see its blue and brown viscera clearly.

“This might be a special kind of sea cucumber, but we need to make sure after further analysis in labs,” Lu Bo, a scientist with the Second Institute of Oceanography of the State Oceanic Administration (SOA), was quoted as saying to state-run Xinhua news agency.

The second weird creature, which looks like a small pink snake, is 330 centimeters long and three centimeters wide and is completely unknown for the scientists. Scientists said two bubbles appeared in its body due to pressure change.

“These two living beings might be new species but we can't be certain with limited tools and data on the ship,” Lu Bo said.

The Jiaolong also collected 15 deep-sea shrimps, water and sulfide weighing 6.9 kilograms.

Earlier, Jiaolong which started the operations few weeks ago already secured contracts to explore Indian Ocean for polymetallic sulphide ore and its research vessel has discovered two hydrothermal areas and four hydrothermal anomaly areas in February this year in southwest Indian Ocean.

China also has obtained exclusive rights to prospect in a 75,000-square-km polymetallic nodule ore deposit in the east Pacific Ocean in 2001.

The Jiaolong, which reached a maximum depth of 7,062 meters in the Mariana Trench in June 2012, is on a 120-day expedition to study polymetallic sulfide, biological diversity, hydrothermal microbes and genetic resources in the southwest Indian Ocean.

(With PTI inputs)

From Zee News

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