Delhi's pollution level 23 times higher than normal, air quality to worsen in coming days

Delhi's air quality witnessed a gradual regression on Diwali night due to bursting of fireworks.

Last Updated: Nov 12, 2015, 13:33 PM IST
Delhi's pollution level 23 times higher than normal, air quality to worsen in coming days

 New Delhi: The national capital of Delhi on Diwali night witnessed a severe rise in the pollution levels with the suspended particulate matter reaching as much as 23 times higher than normal in one of its most polluted areas.

Also Read: Check out: Real-time Air Quality Index Visual Map post Diwali in Delhi

According to real time ambient air quality data of the Delhi Pollution Control Committee, the Respirable Suspended Particulate Matter (RSPM) has spiked by over 23 times from the national ambiance air quality standard at Anand Vihar, says a report from Hindustan Times.

It says at 11pm, the PM10 was recorded at 2,308 microgram per cubic meter (mpcm) while the prescribed standard is 100mpcm. PM2.5 also touched an alarming high at 619mpcm at midnight in this heavily polluted area in East Delhi. The prescribed standard for PM2.5 is 60mpcm.

Also Read: Delhi's pollution nearly 30 times higher than WHO's safety benchmark

Meanwhile, the PM10 in RK Puram was at its peak at 1am at 1,333mpcm while PM2.5 touched 985mpcm at 9.20pm.

In Punjabi Bagh, the PM2.5 was at its peak at 1am and was recorded at 638mpcm, while PM10 was recorded as 1,033mpcm highest also at 1am, the report added.

On Wednesday, the IGI Airport station of System of Air Quality, Weather Forecasting and Research (SAFAR) showed PM 2.5 and PM 10 readings at 325 microgram per cubic metre and 452 microgram per cubic metre respectively at around 3 pm – which is a severe reading.

The corresponding safe limits stand at 60 microgram per cubic metre and 100 microgram per cubic metre.

However, the air quality in the national capital may worsen as reports suggest that the level of particulate matter (PM2.5) is likely to increase by 148 per cent due to polluting fire crackers.