World’s rich putting earth at risk of century of disasters

Last Updated: Thursday, April 26, 2012 - 12:01

London: Global population must be stabilised quickly and high consumption in wealthy nations should be rapidly reduced to save our planet from “a downward spiral of economic and environmental ills”, researchers have warned.

Contraception must be provided to all women who want it and consumption cut to reduce inequality, said the study, which was chaired by Nobel prize-winning biologist Sir John Sulston.

The assessment of humanity’s prospects in the next 100 years, which has taken 21 months to complete, argues strongly that to achieve long and healthy lives for all 9 billion people expected to be living in 2050, the twin issues of population and consumption must pushed to the top of political and economic agendas, the Guardian reported.

Both the issues have been majorly ignored by politicians and played down by environment and development groups for 20 years, the report asserted.

“The number of people living on the planet has never been higher, their levels of consumption are unprecedented and vast changes are taking place in the environment. We can choose to rebalance the use of resources to a more egalitarian pattern of consumption ... or we can choose to do nothing and to drift into a downward spiral of economic and environmental ills leading to a more unequal and inhospitable future”, it said.

At present day’s rate of population rise developing countries will have to build the equivalent of a city of a million people every five days from now to 2050, said the report.

“Global population growth is inevitable for the next few decades. By 2050, it is projected that today’s population of 7 billion will have grown by 2.3 billion, the equivalent of a new China and an India.”

But the steep number of people on earth is not as important as their inequality and how much they consume, said Jules Pretty, one of the working group of 22 who produced the report.

“In material terms it will be necessary for most developed countries to abstain from certain sorts of consumption, such as CO2. You do not need to be consuming so much to have a long and healthy life.”

“We cannot conceive of a world that is going to be as unequal as it is now. We must bring the 1.3 billion people living on less than a 1.25 dollars a day out of absolute poverty. It’s critical to slow population growth in those countries which cannot keep up with services.”

The report gave the example of Niger in West Africa, which has increased life expectancy in the past 30 years but is doubling population every 20 years.

Most of the global population growth in the next century will come from the 48 least developed countries, of which 32 are in Africa, said Ekliya Zulu, one of the authors and president of the Union for African Population studies.

The authors admitted that it would take time and massive political commitment to shift consumption patterns in rich countries, but believe that providing contraception would cost comparatively little.

The authors refused to put a figure on sustainable population, insisting that it depended on lifestyle choices and consumption. But they warned that without urgent action humanity would be in deep trouble.

“The pressure on a finite planet will make us radically change human activity”, said Pretty.

“The planet has sufficient resources to sustain 9 billion, but we can only ensure a sustainable future for all if we address grossly unequal levels of consumption,” said an Oxfam spokeswoman.

“Fairly redistributing the lion’s share of the earth’s resources consumed by the richest 10 percent would bring development so that infant mortality rates are reduced, many more people are educated and women are empowered to determine their family size – all of which will bring down birth rates”, the spokeswoman added.

ANI



First Published: Thursday, April 26, 2012 - 12:01

More from zeenews

 
comments powered by Disqus