DU restructures BTech courses offered under now defunct FYUP

Following directions from AICTE, Delhi University has restructured six BTech courses which were introduced as part of the now defunct Four Year Undergraduate Programme (FYUP).

LifeIsMusic| Updated: Jul 22, 2015, 19:52 PM IST
DU restructures BTech courses offered under now defunct FYUP

New Delhi: Following directions from AICTE, Delhi University has restructured six BTech courses which were introduced as part of the now defunct Four Year Undergraduate Programme (FYUP).

All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE) had given a conditional approval to the university in May this year for the 2013-14 batch which had taken admission in the BTech courses, as part of the FYUP, which was last year scrapped following UGC intervention.

"The syllabi and courses of study pertaining to six BTech programmes in computer science, electronics, food technology, instrumentation, allied papers and polymer science, have been restructured after AICTE had given a conditional approval to run these courses," Abha Dev Habib, an Executive Council (EC) member said.

The restructured courses were approved by the varsity in an EC meeting on Monday.

After the FYUP was rolled back, UGC had directed DU to continue with these six BTech programmes but only for benefit of over 6,000 students admitted in the academic year 2013-2014.

However, 27 colleges offering the courses were asked to seek approval from AICTE, the apex advisory body regulating technical education in the country.

With several deadlines lapsing over the months, students had raised concerns over non-approval of the courses. HRD minister Smriti Irani in February this year had directed the VC to do the needful.

The lack of AICTE approval for the BTech programmes was also a bone of contention between the HRD ministry and DU VC Dinesh Singh.

In April, AICTE had given the colleges a 'six-hour' deadline to submit an affidavit promising that they would address the shortcomings of faculty and infrastructure within the next six months.

The principals had found the deadline to be "impractical", following which the varsity had taken up the issue with AICTE, which had agreed to take a lenient view of the case.

Finally, the conditional approval was granted to the colleges in May.