15 new genetic regions linked to heart disease identified

Last Updated: Monday, December 3, 2012 - 16:07

Washington: Scientists have identified 15 new genetic regions associated with coronary artery disease, a deadly condition which causes plaque buildup in heart vessels.

The new research brings the total number of validated genetic links with heart disease discovered through genome-wide association studies to 46.

The study published in the journal Nature Genetics, provides insights into the molecular pathways causing coronary artery disease, which is also known as coronary atherosclerosis.

Coronary artery disease is the process by which plaque builds up in the wall of heart vessels, eventually leading to chest pain and potentially lethal heart attacks.

"Perhaps the most interesting results of this study show that some people may be born with a predisposition to the development of coronary atherosclerosis because they have inherited mutations in some key genes related to inflammation," said Themistocles (Tim) Assimes, one of the study`s lead authors from Stanford University Medical Center.

"There has been much debate as to whether inflammation seen in plaque buildup in heart vessels is a cause or a consequence of the plaques themselves," Assimes said in a statement.

"Our network analysis of the top approximately 240 genetic signals in this study seems to provide evidence that genetic defects in some pathways related to inflammation are a cause," Assimes said.

More than 170 researchers were involved in this massive meta-analysis combining genetic data from more than 190,000 research participants.

Interestingly, about a quarter of the genetic regions associated with coronary disease or heart attack were also found to be strongly associated with cholesterol, especially high levels of the so-called bad cholesterol known as LDL.

Another 10 percent were associated with high blood pressure. Both of these conditions are known risk factors for coronary artery disease.

"The signals that do not point to known risk factors may be pointing to novel mechanisms of disease," Assimes said.

"It is imperative that we quickly gain a better understanding of how these regions are linked to heart disease, as such understanding will greatly facilitate the development of new drugs to prevent heart disease," Assimes added.

PTI



First Published: Monday, December 3, 2012 - 16:06

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