People with diabetes 50% more likely to have heart attack

Last Updated: Wednesday, January 2, 2013 - 17:16

London: Diabetes sufferers are almost 50 percent more likely to have a heart attack than the rest of the population, according to a new UK report.

The risk is not only high for those with type 2 diabetes but type 1 diabetes sufferers, a condition which develops in childhood, are also at a greater risk of heart attack.
The findings come from the National Diabetes Audit which analysed the care of two million people with diabetes in 2010 and 2011 in England and Wales.

According to the report, 14,476 of those included in the audit had a heart attack during 2010 and 2011, which is 4,694 more than expected.

In 2010 and 2011 - 45,000 people with diabetes suffered heart failure - 17,700 (65 per cent) more than the number expected (27,300).

The report found people with diabetes are at a 40 per cent higher risk of death than the general population, with 65,700 diabetics dying in 2011 - when 47,000 such deaths were expected.

People with diabetes are at a 40 per cent higher risk of death than the general population, with 65,700 diabetics dying in 2011 - when 47,000 such deaths were expected.

The report estimates there were 22,200 excess deaths in England and 1,900 in Wales among people with diabetes.

Around 2.8 million people have diabetes in the UK, while an additional 850,000 people are unaware they have it.

The report included people with type 1 diabetes, which usually develops in childhood and is controlled by insulin injections, and type 2 - which is linked to unhealthy lifestyles and obesity.

Nine out of ten people with diabetes have type 2 which occurs when the body gradually loses the ability to process blood sugar, leading to high levels which can damage body organs and years of ill-health.

The report estimates there were 22,200 excess deaths in England and 1,900 in Wales among people with diabetes.

Women with diabetes were at a greater relative risk of death than men with diabetes: at 142 percent for Type 1 and 40 percent for Type 2 for women, compared to 130 percent and 33 percent respectively for men.

Campaigners claim the health toll is the `tip of the iceberg` as the audit does not include 10 percent of people with the condition and those living elsewhere in the UK.

PTI



First Published: Wednesday, January 2, 2013 - 17:16

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