'Antibacterial resistance' bigger risk factor for Cystic Fibrosis?

A new research has revealed that 'antibacterial resistance' may be a bigger risk factor for Cystic Fibrosis disease than perceived.

London: A new research has revealed that 'antibacterial resistance' may be a bigger risk factor for Cystic Fibrosis disease than perceived.

Researcher Stuart Elborn from Queen's University Belfast said that more funding and further research are required into antibiotic resistance in order to improve patient outcomes for people with Cystic Fibrosis.

Researchers stated that while not all resistance found in bacteria is caused by antibiotics, the increasing resistance to antibiotics is proving a major problem in treating people with Cystic Fibrosis.

Elborn added that while antibiotic treatment has undeniably resulted in increased life expectancy for patients with Cystic Fibrosis during the past 50 years, the emergence of antimicrobial resistance is a cause for major concern.

Elborn continued that they need to look at the use of compounds that may work against bacteria in a way that helps our current antibiotics to be more effective and such compounds are readily available for treatment of other conditions.

The study is published in The Lancet.

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