Interpregnancy interval increases risk of autism in children

Autistic children often face problem in communicating and they usually don't participate in social interactions.

Zee Media Bureau

New Delhi: Children born in a gap of less than a year or more than five years after birth of their prior siblings are at a higher risk of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), according to a latest study.

The study shows how short as well as long intervals in pregnancy increases the risk of autism in younger child.

The scientists of University of Velle found that women, whose gap between pregnancies is less than two years are more likely to give birth to a child with autism.

Similarly, long intervals between pregnancies, more than five years, also raises the risk of autism, in particular Asperger disorder and pervasive development disorder.

The study published in journal Pediatrics showed that Women who become pregnant before folate restoration is complete have an increased risk of folate insufficiency at the time of conception and during pregnancy.

As a consequence, there would be an early alteration in the fetal neurodevelopment that could lead to ASD in early childhood.

They also found that infertility, unintended pregnancy and maternal inflammation could be the links between long birth intervals and autism.

Autistic children often face problem in communicating and they usually don't participate in social interactions.

Globally, the risk between spacing pregnancy and autism has received less attention.

In was in 2005 that World Health Organization (WHO) highlighted the impact of spacing pregnancy on neurological and psychological development of children.

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