19-month-old along with 9 others in grip of swine flu in Delhi

A 19-month-old toddler is the latest to have contracted swine flu virus along with nine others in the national capital, taking the total figure to 60 so far this year.

PTI| Last Updated: Jan 13, 2015, 20:02 PM IST

New Delhi: A 19-month-old toddler is the latest to have contracted swine flu virus along with nine others in the national capital, taking the total figure to 60 so far this year.

The 19-month-old girl is a resident of Freedom Fighter Enclave in South Delhi and is undergoing treatment in private.

The other affected include a 47-year-old man (South Extension) being treated in private, 35-year-old woman (Freedom Fighter Enclave) treated in private, 55-year-old man (Ashram Marg) undergoing treatment at Holy Family hospital, 40-year-old man (MB Road) being treated at Safdarjung, 55-year-old woman (Budh Vihar) admitted in Bhagwan Mahavir hospital and 31-year old woman being treated at Lady Hardinge hospital.

Also, a 31-year-old woman and 33-year-old man, residents of Nab Sarai and 29-year-old man from Kirki Extension) are undergoing treatment at Madan Mohan Malviya Hospital.

The swine flu till now has claimed four lives in Delhi.

With number of swine flu cases rising in the city, the Health department of Delhi government today held an emergency meeting with the Directorate of Health Services and has put all the 22 designated hospitals on alert and directed them to follow the standard operating procedure for treatment of swine flu, a Health Department official said.

Last year, 38 cases of swine-flu and zero deaths were reported in Delhi.

"Swine influenza A (H1N1) virus spreads in the same way as the seasonal flu and even the symptoms are similar to the symptoms of regular flu which includes fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, vomiting and fatigue," said a Health Ministry official.

"However, it can be serious for elderly or children with low immunity or people who have health complications like heart diseases, cancer, HIV, diabetes or pregnant women, elderly or children with low immunity.

"Infected people can pass the infection to others a day before symptoms develop and up to seven or more days after becoming sick," said a health expert.