Early skin-to-skin contact associated with higher breastfeeding rates

Last Updated: Monday, October 28, 2013 - 19:10

Washington: A new study has revealed that skin-to-skin contact between mother and baby in the delivery room is linked positively to an increased likelihood for exclusive breastfeeding.

Researchers, who found that when combined with a mother's intent to breastfeed, the likelihood was even greater, reviewed electronic medical records of single, late preterm or term healthy births at a New York hospital.

Study authors looked for information on whether or not the mother and infant had skin-to-skin contact in the delivery room, as well as maternal age, intention to breastfeed, gestational age, mode of delivery, admission temperature and glucose testing on admission to the newborn nursery.

In total, 150 newborn hospital records were reviewed, of which 53 percent of the infants had skin-to-skin contact with their mothers in the delivery room. Seventy-two percent of the mothers intended to breastfeed exclusively, although only 28 percent actually did.

The intention to breastfeed and skin-to-skin contact were significantly related to exclusive breastfeeding, independent of maternal age, mode of delivery, parity and gestational age. When corrected for gestational age and delivery mode, exclusive breastfeeding was significantly associated with skin-to-skin contact.

The study was presented at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference and Exhibition in Orlando.

ANI

First Published: Monday, October 28, 2013 - 19:10

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