Heart`s own stem cells could help treat cardiac failure
Last Updated: Friday, August 16, 2013, 13:38
  

Washington: Researchers have highlighted, for the first time, the natural regenerative capacity of a group of stem cells that reside in the heart.

According to the new study these cells are responsible for repairing and regenerating muscle tissue damaged by a heart attack that leads to heart failure.

The study shows that if the stem cells are eliminated, the heart is unable to repair after damage. If the cardiac stem cells are replaced the heart repairs itself, leading to complete cellular, anatomical and functional heart recovery, with the heart returning to normal and pumping at a regular rate.

Also, if the cardiac stem cells are removed and re-injected, they naturally `home` to and repair the damaged heart, a discovery that could lead to less-invasive treatments and even early prevention of heart failure in the future.

The study had set out to establish the role of cardiac stem cells (eCSCs) by first removing the cells from the hearts of rodents with heart failure. This stopped regeneration and recovery of the heart, demonstrating the intrinsic regenerative capacity of these cells for repairing the heart in response to heart failure.

Current treatments for heart failures are aimed at treating the underlying causes, such as coronary heart disease, heart attack and blood pressure through lifestyle changes, medicines and in severe cases, surgery.

These treatments are sometimes successful in preventing or delaying heart failure. However, once heart failure develops the only curative treatment is heart transplantation.

By revealing this robust homing mechanism, which causes cardiac stem cells to home to and repair the heart`s damaged muscle, the findings could lead to less invasive treatments or even preventative measures aimed at maintaining or increasing the activity of the heart`s own cardiac stem cells.

Dr Georgina Ellison, the first author of the paper and Professor Bernardo Nadal-Ginard, the study`s corresponding author, both from the Centre of Human and Aerospace Physiological Sciences and the Centre for Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine at King`s, said that in a healthy heart the quantity of cardiac stem cells is sufficient to repair muscle tissue in the heart.

They said that however, in damaged hearts many of these cells cannot multiply or produce new muscle tissue. In these cases it could be possible to replace the damaged cardiac stem cells or add new ones by growing them in the laboratory and administering them intravenously.

Ellison said that understanding the role and potential of cardiac stems cells could pave the way for a variety of new ways to prevent and treat heart failure.

She said that these new approaches involve maintaining or increasing the activity of cardiac stem cells so that muscle tissue in the heart can be renewed with new heart cells, replacing old cells or those damaged by wear and tear.

Ellison asserted that the cardiac stem cells naturally home to the heart because the heart is their home - they know to go there.

She explained that current practices involve major operations such as injection through the heart`s muscle wall (intramyocardial) or coronary vessels (intracoronary).

She added that the homing mechanism shown by our research could lead to a less invasive treatment whereby cardiac stem cells are injected through a vein in the skin (intravenously).

The study has been published in the journal Cell.

ANI


First Published: Friday, August 16, 2013, 13:38



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