'Humanized' mice antibody may help cure Sudan ebolavirus

A new study has revealed that a "humanized' version of an antibody, which was made in mice, may help cure the most lethal strain of Ebola, Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV).

ANI| Updated: Aug 28, 2014, 16:36 PM IST

Washington: A new study has revealed that a "humanized' version of an antibody, which was made in mice, may help cure the most lethal strain of Ebola, Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV).

John Dye, Sachdev Sidhu, Jonathan Lai and colleagues explain that about 50-90 percent of ebola patients die after experiencing the typical symptoms of the disease, which include fever, muscle aches, vomiting and bleeding.

The team's antibody was directed against SUDV and was. But the human immune system could potentially recognize that antibody as foreign and ultimately get rid of it, preventing the antibody from treating the disease.

The team, who put the ebola-specific part of the mouse antibody onto a human antibody scaffold, made some changes to this molecule and identified two versions that were able to fend off SUDV in laboratory tests on cells and in specially bred mice.

The researchers said that these antibodies represent strong immunotherapeutic candidates for the treatment of SUDV infection.

The study was published in the journal ACS.