Mexican researcher claims to detect Ebola using microfluidics

Ebola can be quickly detected using microfluidics, the study of very tiny volumes of liquids, according to Juan Pablo Agusil Antonoff, a specialist in biomedical engineering at the Ibero-American University in Mexico.

Mexico City: Ebola can be quickly detected using microfluidics, the study of very tiny volumes of liquids, according to Juan Pablo Agusil Antonoff, a specialist in biomedical engineering at the Ibero-American University in Mexico.

Agusil Antonoff, who is also pursuing a doctorate in nanotechnology in Spain, spoke on microfluidics at a conference in the university Wednesday.

Microfluidics is a system which allows the swift detection of a parasite, bacteria or virus inside an organism from samples of body fluids, such as blood, saliva or urine, by studying the production of antibodies, he explained.

"Microfluidics is so sensitive that even minimum amounts of antibodies inside a person can be discovered," Agusil Antonoff added.

He stressed that this very sensitivity enables it to detect any disease at the earliest, allowing the immediate treatment and isolation of the infected person.

Another benefit, according to Antonoff, is that it does away with the need for visits to hospitals and clinics as tests can now be done at home as in the case of pregnancy tests and glucometer readings.

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