Vitamin D does not prevent development of type 2 diabetes

A new study has revealed that there is no substantial proof that vitamin D helps in preventing the development of type 2 diabetes in people.

London: A new study has revealed that there is no substantial proof that vitamin D helps in preventing the development of type 2 diabetes in people.

The study, conducted by scientists at the University of Cambridge, challenge evidence from earlier observational studies which suggested that higher concentrations of circulating vitamin D might prevent type 2 diabetes.

The researchers found no association between different gene variants that control vitamin D levels and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Moreover, the study also examined the link between vitamin D status and several physiological characteristics of type 2 diabetes, such as glucose and glycated haemoglobin, and also found no evidence of a causative link.

Dr Nita Forouhi, at the Medical Research Council (MRC) Epidemiology Unit at the University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, said that observational studies that show a strong and consistent higher risk of type 2 diabetes with lower levels of vitamin D might do so because they have thus far not been able to adequately control for distorting or confounding factors, such as physical activity levels, that may be related both to vitamin D levels and to the risk of type 2 diabetes.

Further research are yet needed with both better clinical trials and better observational studies with more precise measurement of important factors that might affect vitamin D and disease relationships, she further added.

The study is published today in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology journal. 

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