Have fish, soak up some sun for healthy brain

Eating enough sea fish and outdoor activities affect the levels of brain chemical serotonin that plays a role in ameliorating the symptoms associated with a broad array of brain disorders, new research has found.

New York: Eating enough sea fish and outdoor activities affect the levels of brain chemical serotonin that plays a role in ameliorating the symptoms associated with a broad array of brain disorders, new research has found.

Many clinical disorders, such as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and depression share as a unifying attribute low brain serotonin.

"In this paper we explain how serotonin is a critical modulator of executive function, impulse control, sensory gating, and pro-social behaviour," said Rhonda Patrick from Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute (CHORI).

"We link serotonin production and function to vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids, suggesting one way these important micro-nutrients help the brain function and affect the way we behave," Patrick added.

Vitamin D is mostly produced by the skin when exposed to sun, and those who do not eat enough fish are likely to have marine omega-3 deficiencies.

The study explains that low vitamin D and marine omega-3 deficiencies interact with genetic pathways, such as the serotonin pathway, that are important for brain development, social cognition and decision-making, the researchers added.

The study was published in FASEB Journal.

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. You can find out more by clicking this link

Close