Corporate espionage scandal: Main focus is to stop unauthorised entry into ministries, says CISF

In the wake of the recent corporate espionage scandal, the CISF on Monday said it will ensure tight access control and "anti-sabotage measures" at sensitive government installations and ministries that it secures in the national capital.

PTI| Last Updated: Mar 09, 2015, 21:47 PM IST

New Delhi: In the wake of the recent corporate espionage scandal, the CISF on Monday said it will ensure tight access control and "anti-sabotage measures" at sensitive government installations and ministries that it secures in the national capital.

CISF chief Arvind Ranjan said the force's "main focus" is to stop any unauthorised entry into these offices and enforce strict access control allowing only those who have either IDs issued by the government or authentic passes, but made it clear that it was not planning to deploy any new drill.

Refusing comment on specific instances of the case where Delhi Police arrested over a dozen people, including officials of the Oil and Defence Ministries among others, for allegedly leaking sensitive government documents, he said, "The case is under investigation. I cannot comment much on it..."

"We will have to wait till Delhi Police files a charge sheet... We will ensure that the security measures at these places remain tight," he said while interacting with reporters on the eve of the forces' 46th Raising Day here.

"We have no plan to intensify our protocols but I can assure (you) that anti-sabotage checks and strict access control are done at all the government installations we are deployed at," added Ranjan, whose force secures government offices including Shastri Bhawan where the alleged espionage racket was detected.

The Central Industrial Security Force (CISF) has carved out a special unit, based in Delhi, within its establishment to secure government departments and offices of high-profile ministries like Defence, Home and Finance.

On VVIP security duties rendered by the force, the DG said the number of its protectees has come down to about 30 from 44. "The numbers (of VVIPs/VIPs) have come down. The government has also accepted our proposal to review the strength of our VVIP security unit every six months.

"One review has just happened and we have enough number of commandos to secure the VVIPs under our security umbrella," he said, refusing to disclose "the names of our protectees".