Irony, satire missing from present political scenario: Tharoor

"I am now residing in a political world where irony is dead", says writer-turned-politician and Congress leader Shashi Tharoor.

PTI| Last Updated: Sep 23, 2014, 23:13 PM IST

New Delhi: "I am now residing in a political world where irony is dead", says writer-turned-politician and Congress leader Shashi Tharoor.

Celebrating the 25th anniversary of his book?"The Great Indian Novel" here today, he said "I am now residing in a political world where irony is dead. We don't do nuances in politics and if we try to do that people will twist and turn your words and hammer it on to you. So, you will miss the satire in today's contemporary world."

The widely acclaimed book is based on the story of the Mahabharata. The book retells modern Indian history and renowned political personalities begin to resemble characters from the Mahabharata.

"The political leaders which we had during the 20th century were larger-than-life characters which I frankly feel is missing in this slightly more mundane life which we are living...," said Tharoor.

Brimming with incisive wit and as enjoyable a read as it is cerebrally stimulating, The Great Indian Novel brilliantly retells reality as myth.

? However, Tharoor says, "if a sequel to the book had to be written it would not be by me because in this world now there are different constraints.

"The kind of freedom which I wrote with, that is no longer possible with the political life I have chosen," said he.

The Congress leader had written the book when he was working at the United Nation (UN) as a junior officer and was quite skeptical whether the book would be banned or not because of the political implications and characters which were synonymous with the leaders of that era.

The book has references to dynasty politics in the country which, according to the author-cum-politician, should not be commented upon in the present-day political scenario.

"?See, it's really not right for me to comment on whether Mulyam's son should be a chief minister of UP or whether Ajit Singh should now be turning his house into a memorial and whether we should have rival Thacherays in Maharashtra competing for the legacy.