Kailash Manasarovar Yatra: Some interesting facts about Mount Kailash

Lord Shiva is seated in a never ending meditative posture on Mouth Kailash. 

Last Updated: Mar 18, 2016, 16:33 PM IST
Kailash Manasarovar Yatra: Some interesting facts about Mount Kailash

New Delhi: With annual Kailash Manasarovar Yatra scheduled to commence from June 12 to September 09, 2016 through Lipulekh and Nathu La, here are some interesting facts about Mount Kailash, which is believed to be the abode of Lord Shiva.

Mouth Kailash is a massive black rock and lies near the the source of some of the longest rivers – Brahmaputra, Sutlej, Indus, and Karnali River. Notably, Karnali river is a tributary of the sacred Ganga river.

It is believed that Lord Shiva is seated in a never ending meditative posture on the sacred mountain, which soars to over 22,000 feet.

Climbing Mount Kailash is forbidden as Hindus believe that Lord Shiva permanently resides there and shouldn't be disturbed. The Hindus also believe that the sacred mountain is a gateway to heaven.

It also holds religious importance for Jains and Buddhists.

There are two sacred lakes - Mansarovar and Rakshatal - on it. While Mansarovar lake is the highest body of fresh water in the world, the Rakshatal is considered the lake of demon and remains stormy.

Mt Kailash is also called the Axis Mundi, the centre of the universe, the navel of the world.

In 1999, some Russian scientists concluded that the complex of pyramids - Kailash, the so-called “City of the Gods“, was built by the representatives of advanced civilisation.

No one has ever been able to climb Mount Kailash.

The Kailash Manasarovar Yatra involves trekking at high altitudes of up to 19,500 feet, under inhospitable conditions, including extreme cold and rugged terrain, and may prove hazardous for those who are not physically and medically fit.