close
This ad will auto close in 10 seconds

Narendra Modi in US: PM meets Cameron, Hollande

Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Monday held separate bilateral meetings with his British counterpart David Cameron and French President Francois Hollande during which talks were held on key issues like terrorism, UNSC reforms and climate change.



New York: Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Monday held separate bilateral meetings with his British counterpart David Cameron and French President Francois Hollande during which talks were held on key issues like terrorism, UNSC reforms and climate change.

Modi held the bi-laterals soon after he arrived from his weekend trip to the Silicon Valley where he met several technology leaders, including Apple CEO Tim Cook and Google's newly-appointed Indian-origin CEO Sundar Pichai.

Modi's first engagement of the day soon after his arrival to the "city that never sleeps" was with Cameron.

The two leaders discussed bilateral and global issues such as terrorism, UN Security Council reforms and climate change.

In his second engagement of the day, Modi met Hollande.

UNSC reforms, terrorism, the threat posed by Islamic State and the upcoming Paris summit on climate change were among the issues discussed.

Both Britain and France have supported India's candidature for a permanent seat at the UN Security Council.

During Modi's bilateral with Hollande, they had a surprise visitor in Bill Gates, who was not present at the meeting Modi had with technology leaders in San Jose over the weekend.

External Affairs Ministry spokesman Vikas Swarup said Gates dropped by to meet the Prime Minister. 

From Zee News

0 Comment - Join the Discussions

trending

photo gallery

video

DNA EXCLUSIVES

India needs one more big push for construction of ‘Big Dams’

Pakistan at UNGA: Islamabad continues to live in denial with same old rhetoric

Mahamana Express: 10 things you need to know about Varanasi-Vadodara train

What is a stimulus package and how will it help to save Indian economy from slowdown: 5 points to know

India requires out-of-the box thinking on tax reforms