Love Jihad: Shiv Sena to launch 'Love Trishul' to protect Hindu girls

To counter ‘Love Jihad’, a term considered to be an Islamist strategy to convert Hindu women through seduction, marriage and money, the Uttar Pradesh unit of Shiv Sena has come up with an idea to create 'Love Trishul'.

Bareilly: To counter ‘Love Jihad’, a term considered to be an Islamist strategy to convert Hindu women through seduction, marriage and money, the Uttar Pradesh unit of Shiv Sena has come up with an idea to create 'Love Trishul'.

According to a leading newspaper, the party is planning to form a gang of people who would act and intervene each time a case of ‘Love Jihad’ is reported from the state.

“'Love Trishul' will be first formed in Bareilly and then it will spread across UP,” president of UP Shiv Sena Anil Singh said. 

Singh further said that the main objective behind forming ‘Love Trishul’ is to save young Hindu women who are at the risk of conversion after being trapped in relationships.

In a controversial statement today, senior Samajwadi Party leader Azam Khan said, "Both the words, 'Love' and 'Jihad', are 'Paak Lafz'... And should not be misused...", PTI reported.

Khan also said that those who are misusing the words to create division between communities should be punished as per law.

Earlier this month a national-level rifle shooter Tara Shahdeo complained of being a "Love Jihad" victim, saying her Muslim husband hid his religion when they married in Ranchi.

In response, hardline Hindu outfits rampaged through the town and declared a day-long strike. Other violent protests have broken out in recent days close to the national capital.

A pamphlet named "Love Jihad" is being widely circulated by members of Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (RSS) at Hindu weddings, festivals and outside colleges across the country.

According to reports, various RSS-linked groups have stepped up a campaign against 'Love Jihad', days after al Qaeda leader Ayman al-Zawahri`s announcement came on formation of an Indian branch of his militant group.

However, police investigations have found no evidence of an organised 'Love Jihad' group. But the concept has gained credence across central India in recent weeks, leading to sometimes- violent protests, despite being considered an absurd conspiracy theory by mainstream, moderate Indians.

While avoiding the term 'Love Jihad', the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party also adopted the subject of forced conversions as a campaign issue ahead of the September 13 by-elections in Uttar Pradesh, a state prone to sectarian strife.