Heavy rains affect normal life in Delhi, Mumbai

Heavy rains lashed several parts of Delhi and Mumbai leading to waterlogging and huge traffic snarls.

Updated: Jul 08, 2011, 14:19 PM IST

New Delhi/Mumbai: Heavy rains lashed several parts of the national capital Friday morning, leading to waterlogging and huge traffic snarls, officials said.

Commuters in Vasant Vihar, Munirka, Dhaula Kuan, Pragati Maidan, Moolchand, Lajpat Nagar, Laxmi Nagar and Nizamuddin areas had a harrowing time due to heavy traffic jams.

Waterlogging was reported from Mukherjee Nagar, Daryaganj and Tis Hazari, Delhi Traffic Police officials said.

The rains led to the mercury dipping with the minimum at 26.5 degrees, a notch below the average, while the maximum was expected to hover around 35 degrees Celsius, said the India Meteorological Department (IMD).

The Met Office forecast more rains during the day.

Train, air traffic disrupted in Mumbai

Heavy rains continued to lash several parts of the metropolis for the second consecutive day today, disrupting rail and air traffic, causing inconvenience to a lot of commuters.

According to Met department here, Colaba recorded 162.8 mm of rainfall and Santacruz received 116 mm of rainfall from 8.30 am yesterday to 8.30 am today.

Train services on Central railways are running late by at least 15 minutes, while traffic on Western line is late by five-ten minutes, officials said.

Road traffic was slow but there were no snarls on any of the arterial routes. However, air traffic was disrupted for a while this morning on account of the incessant rains.

"Due to sudden drop in visibility of 300 mtrs all flight operations were suspended at the international airport here between 1000 to 1017 hours. But now its all normal," a Mumbai International Airport Limited (MIAL) spokperson said.

Complaints of water logging were reported from areas like Vileparle, Borivali, Kandivali, Malad, Andheri, Malad, Dharavi and few other areas. No incidents of house and wall collapse were reported, officials said.

PTI/IANS