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26/11: Pak panel seeks fresh schedule for visit

Pak has sought a fresh schedule for the visit of a judicial commission which will record statements of key persons involved in the 26/11 Mumbai attack probe.



New Delhi: Pakistan has sought a fresh
schedule for the visit of a judicial commission of that
country, which will record statements of key persons involved
in the 26/11 Mumbai attack probe, after having failed to keep
its earlier dates.

Islamabad has informed India that the 26/11 commission
would like to visit anytime after February 13. However, India
will revert back to Pakistan only after consulting the Mumbai
high court which will suggest fresh dates, official sources
said.

After a long dilly-dally, the Pakistani judicial
commission was supposed to come in the first week of February
but it was cancelled at the eleventh hour.

The commission will record the statement of Ramesh
Mahale, the 26/11 case investigating officer and RV
Sawant-Waghul, the magistrate who recorded the confessional
statement of lone surviving Pakistani terrorist Ajmal Kasab.

The statements of two doctors, who had conducted the
post-mortem of the nine slain terrorists involved in the
attack along with Kasab, will also be recorded by it.

The visit of the commission has been pending for close to
two years and it has been delayed due to one reason or the
other, putting the ongoing trial in the 26/11 case in Pakistan
into uncertainty.

The trial in the Rawalpindi court also has been going on
at a snail`s pace and Indian officials are not very optimistic
that the guilty will be punished any time soon.

PTI

From Zee News

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