Ansari - Change in rules to make archival records

Observing that the study of international affairs in India was "episodic" and "inadequate", Vice President Hamid Ansari today said a "closer scrutiny" was required for looking into availability of archival records.

New Delhi: Observing that the study of
international affairs in India was "episodic" and
"inadequate", Vice President Hamid Ansari today said a "closer
scrutiny" was required for looking into availability of
archival records.

He said India`s understanding of countries and people
that we deal with cannot be based solely on academic output of
foreign institutions.

"We need to evolve a uniquely Indian understanding, based
on the historical context of our relations with other nations
and peoples, as also contemporary realities and concerns. We
need our own culture of strategic thought," the Vice President
said addressing the first National Conference on International
Relations.

Ansari said absence of study of international relations
in the country evoked questions.

"The harsh reality, however, is that the study of
international affairs in our country is episodic, emotive and
inadequate," he said.

Ansari said a "closer scrutiny" was required for looking
into availability of archival records for academic analysis in
the field of international relations.

"Unfortunately, despite significant strides in
transparency, especially through RTI, archival documentation
is so scanty that our researchers are forced to rely on
declassified documents of foreign governments. We do need to
bring our rules on this in line with the practice of other
advanced and open societies," he said.

The Vice President said the study of international
affairs was needed to conceptualise our experience as a player
on the global stage; to study in-depth the countries and
regions of relevance to us and the manner in which this
experience and knowledge can be related to our present and
future policy options.

Ansari said a "closer scrutiny" was required for looking
into availability of archival records for academic analysis in
the field of international relations.

"Unfortunately, despite significant strides in
transparency, especially through RTI, archival documentation
is so scanty that our researchers are forced to rely on
declassified documents of foreign governments. We do need to
bring our rules on this in line with the practice of other
advanced and open societies," he said.

The Vice President said the study of international
affairs was needed to conceptualise our experience as a player
on the global stage; to study in-depth the countries and
regions of relevance to us and the manner in which this
experience and knowledge can be related to our present and
future policy options.

Ansari said a "closer scrutiny" was required for looking
into availability of archival records for academic analysis in
the field of international relations.

"Unfortunately, despite significant strides in
transparency, especially through RTI, archival documentation
is so scanty that our researchers are forced to rely on
declassified documents of foreign governments. We do need to
bring our rules on this in line with the practice of other
advanced and open societies," he said.

The Vice President said the study of international
affairs was needed to conceptualise our experience as a player
on the global stage; to study in-depth the countries and
regions of relevance to us and the manner in which this
experience and knowledge can be related to our present and
future policy options.

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