Bin Laden`s death will not end terrorism: India

Killing of Osama bin Laden did not mean the end of the war against terrorism, as safe havens still exist, India has said, underlining the need to root out the `syndicate of terrorism`.

Updated: May 17, 2011, 21:17 PM IST

United Nations: Killing of Osama bin
Laden did not mean the end of the war against terrorism, as
safe havens still exist, India has said, underlining the need
to root out the "syndicate of terrorism", which includes
elements of the al-Qaida, Taliban and LeT.

"Without the elimination of terrorist safe heavens and
sanctuaries there can be no end to the global war on terror,"
India`s envoy to the UN Hardeep Singh Puri said at a UN
counter-terrorism meeting here, without referring to Pakistan.

He noted that death of bin Laden did not mean the end
of al-Qaida or the war against terrorism.

"We believe that for security and stabilisation of
Afghanistan, it is important to isolate and root out the
syndicate of terrorism which includes elements of the Al
Qaida, Taliban, LeT and other terrorist and extremist groups
operating from within and outside Afghanistan borders," he
added.

Puri is also the current chair of a UN Counter
Terrorism Committee that was established after 9/11 to help
countries prevent terrorist acts.

Puri warned against differentiating between the
Al-Qaida and the Taliban and other terrorist groups.

"These groups are operationally and ideologically
fused," he said.

Puri said that India supported reintegration by the
Afghanistan government those individuals who abjure violence,
give up armed struggle, do not have links with terrorist
groups, and are willing to abide by the values of democracy.

The Indian envoy noted that the `redlines` on the
reintegration process must be laid down and not diluted.

"Otherwise, we risk Afghanistan sliding back to
becoming a safe haven for terrorists and extremist groups," he
said.

Finally, Puri pointed out the dangers of WMDS falling
into the hands of non-state actors and terrorists, and he
warned against clandestine proliferation networks.

"It is important that the international community must
join hands in eliminating the risks relating to sensitive
materials and technologies falling into hands of terrorists
and non-state actors," he said.

PTI