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Cong, left locked in verbal duel in TN assembly

The Congress and Left parties were engaged in a war of words in the state Assembly today over the Indo-US nuclear deal, after Congress charged them with holding the earlier UPA regime to ransom at the height of the issue.



Chennai: The Congress and Left parties were
engaged in a war of words in the state Assembly today over the
Indo-US nuclear deal, after Congress charged them with holding
the earlier UPA regime to ransom at the height of the issue.

Participating in the discussion on the grants for
Electricity department,Arul Anbarasu (Cong) charged the Left
with holding the government to ransom in Parliament, when the
UPA had to face a confidence vote in 2008 after Left parties
withdrew support over the deal.

Joining Anbarasu, senior leader S Peter Alphonse alleged
that this resulted in delays in passing the deal and ensuring
uranium supply,drawing strong reactions from CPI and CPI (M).

Alphonse charged the Leftists with remaining silent on a
nuclear deal China struck with US years ago, which further
irked the left parties.

CPI Floor Leader V Sivapunniam said the Left parties were
opposed to the Hyde Act in the agreement which ``was
against India`s interests.``

CPI (M) member K Balabarathy endorsed his views and wanted
to know what benefits the deal had brought to India. Her
colleague Nanmaran said while China did ink a pact with the
US, it had ``taken measures to shield itself`` against certain
provisions by US but alleged India had agreed to all
provisions laid out by the US.

PTI

From Zee News

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