Impact of Guj riots on women under review by UN

India`s report to the UN on issues related to the impact of the 2002 Gujarat riots on women is under review by a panel of top experts here.

United Nations: India`s report to the UN
on issues related to the impact of the 2002 Gujarat riots on
women is under review by a panel of top experts here.

The experts belonging to the Committee on the
Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), who are
meeting in a 19-day session at the U.N. headquarters, will
review India`s report on the impact of the Gujarat riots.

Following reports submitted previously by India in
2007, the U.N. asked New Delhi to "report on an exceptional
basis" with additional information on the several issues,
including information disaggregated by sex on the cases
relating to the killings, on sexual assault and violence
against women that have been reported and the resolution of
such cases.

It also called for information on arrests made and
punishments imposed, including on state officials who were
found to be complicit in such crimes and on compensation
awarded to women victims, especially of violence against
women.

CEDAW also asked India to report back on 5,000 or so
Muslim families displaced by the violence and measures taken
by the government for their resettlement and rehabilitation.

In seven-page report submitted in December 2009, India
responded to the questions by stating that the cases of 169
persons (146 male and 23 female), who had been reported killed
in 2002 in Gujarat, have been reopened and charge sheets have
been filed in 12 cases of males and 1 case of a female.

It also said that a total of 19 cases of sexual
assault and violence against women had been reported.

The report also said that New Delhi had sanctioned Rs.
23.6 million for organising training for rehabilitation of the
riot affected women and the state government had spent Rs. 23
million for vocational training classes in all districts.

Seven other countries are up for review? Turkey,
Russian Federation, Fiji, Papua New Guinea, Australia,
Argentina and Albania.

The organisation periodically reviews each country
once it becomes a party to the Convention on the Elimination
of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, which was
adopted in 1979. Currently 186 countries have accepted the
Convention.

PTI

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