India conveys deep concern to UNSC over attacks in S Sudan
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Last Updated: Wednesday, April 23, 2014, 13:03
  
United Nations: In the wake of last week's attack on a UN base in South Sudan that injured two Indian peacekeepers, India has conveyed its "deep concern" to the Security Council over the continued hostilities and lack of political dialogue in the troubled nation.

India's Permanent Representative to the UN Asoke Mukerji wrote a letter to President of the UN Security Council for the month, Nigerian Ambassador U Joy Ogwu, in which he voiced concern over the attack in an internally displaced persons camp in Bor where Indian peacekeepers were protecting nearly 5,000 civilians.

Two Indian peacekeepers were injured when a "well-armed" 200-300 strong mob forced its way into the facility and opened fire on the displaced persons sheltering inside.

"It is a matter of deep concern to my country that despite the clear call given by the UNSC resolution, neither have hostilities ceased and nor has any political dialogue progressed in South Sudan," Mukerji said in the letter dated April 17.

"The consequence of this is the increase in violent attacks, especially on civilians in South Sudan," he said.

Mukerji stressed that "troops contributed by member States, including India, to UNMISS cannot be expected to deal with the political causes for the hostilities and violence, resulting from the lack of political dialogue, in South Sudan."

He requested that India's concerns be brought to the attention of the UNSC members so that the Council can "give priority in its work to achieving a political agreement between the parties in South Sudan."

He noted that this in India's view is the "essential prerequisite to end the hostilities in South Sudan and protect the lives of innocent civilians in the country."

India is the single largest troop contributor to the UN Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) and in the last one year seven Indian soldiers have been killed in attacks on UN bases.

PTI

First Published: Wednesday, April 23, 2014, 13:03


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