India major strategic partner: US

The Obama Administration has identified India as a major strategic partner in the new international order as it unveiled its new National Security Strategy.

Washington: The Obama Administration has identified India as a major strategic partner in the new international order as it unveiled its new National Security Strategy that gives top priority to deepening its partnership with two other major powers – China and Russia.

"If you take a nation like India in particular, too, that`s only enhanced by the fact that India is a democracy, and that they`re a nation that we share democratic values with as well, which I think informs the depth of the strategic partnership that we`re pursuing with them, both in the region and around the world," said Ben Rhodes, deputy national security advisor.

The 52-page document submitted to the Congress said that the US will continue to deepen its cooperation with other 21st century centres of influence – including China, India and Russia – on the basis of mutual interests and mutual respect.

"We think it`s critical that if you look at China, if you look at India, as nations that, of course, have had a dramatic economic growth in recent years, play an increasingly important role in the regions that they`re in but also on global issues, that we see expanded and deepened cooperation between the United States and those nations as essential to addressing our priorities," Rhodes said in response to a question on Thursday.

"I think that, again, if you stack up the key issues, they`re going to define the trajectory of the next 10 or 20 years, whether it`s terrorism, global economy, climate change, non-proliferation, that we need to be enlisting the cooperation of India, of China, to address those issues.

So, you know, I think we do put an important focus on that, as part of our engagement," Rhodes said.

The top White House official said, "In the administration`s approach more broadly, a focus that we place on our engagement with those countries, both on a bilateral basis and globally.

He argued the US actually shares more interests in common with a range of nations including India than has been reflected in the depth of our cooperation in the past.

"India, we`ve had very good cooperation with. But if you take a nation like China, I think that, as issues become increasingly global, that we have more mutual interests, in some respects, than our habits of cooperation have indicated," he said.

PTI

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