NIA trailed Pak spy for weeks before arrest

A Sri Lankan national held here for allegedly spying for Pakistan was trailed by the sleuths of the NIA for weeks before his arrest and the probe agency has clinching evidence to nail the accused, police sources said.

PTI| Updated: Sep 13, 2014, 00:34 AM IST

Chennai: A Sri Lankan national held here for allegedly spying for Pakistan was trailed by the sleuths of the NIA for weeks before his arrest and the probe agency has clinching evidence to nail the accused, police sources said.

Arun Selvarajan's mobile phone conversations were intercepted for weeks by the NIA sleuths and he was kept under "high-tech surveillance."

After several weeks of monitoring, it became clear that his intentions were "illegal, anti-national and intended to aid an inimical neighbour's nefarious designs," an official said.

The intercepts gave ample clues that Pakistan was now "seriously working" to set up modules in South India to target "high value assets," through "new avenues."

"In fact, Arun has given extra-judicial confession that he had acted at the behest of his handlers in Pakistan High Commission in Colombo, and there are enough incriminating material evidence to prove this."

"Several bank accounts,the numerous dubious transactions, and money transfers strengthens the case."

The eventual arrest of the Sri lankan began with efforts to "join dots to fix some missing links" in the Thameem Ansari spying case which is also being probed by the NIA.

Sources, however, declined to specify if Thameem Ansari and Arun Selvarajan knew each other and whether they were aware that they were working for the "same boss."

Arun Selvarajan, by posing as an event management professional had allegedly accessed vital installations like the Coast Guard and the Officers Training Academy.

He was arrested on September 10 and remanded to judicial custody the following day.

Laptop, hard disks, pen drives, micro-tape cassettes were among the seizures made by the NIA from his residence.

Also, the accused was found in possession of both Indian and Srilankan passports besides ganja.